How many carbs should I eat a day?

Carbs are part of a well-balanced diet “Carbs,” also known as carbohydrates, are one of the macronutrients, which are the compounds that give your body energy in the form of calories. Foods with carbs are digested into sugar, which provides your body with glucose, an important source of energy. Your body requires carbohydrates to function properly. There are two main types of carbs: complex and simple. Complex carbohydrates are those that are less processed, more slowly digested, and high in dietary fiber. Simple carbohydrates are those that are more quickly digested. They…

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Later meal times can promote weight gain and upset metabolism

For the first time, researchers offer experimental evidence that, compared with eating earlier in the day, a pattern of later meal times can promote weight gain and has an unfavorable impact on energy metabolism and hormonal markers that are linked to health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. A new study has shown that regularly eating later in the day can have negative health consequences. A report on the findings – led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia – were presented at…

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What are the possible benefits of MCT oil?

Medium-chain triglycerides are a type of fat that is found in certain oils and dairy products. MCT oil is a supplement made of these fats. But what are the potential health benefits of MCT oil? Many articles in circulation recommend the use of MCT oil. They claim that it can help people lose weight and that it has several other benefits. This article explores the health benefits of MCT oil, as supported by scientific evidence. It also considers the risks around the use of MCT oil, as well as where…

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How can we switch off hunger in the brain? Study sheds light

Many of us think that controlling our food cravings and sticking to a diet depend largely on our willpower, but our biology has a different story to tell. Now, new research shows that a complex interplay between calories, digestion hormones, and neurons determines what we eat and when. What happens in our brain when we’re hungry, and is there anything we can do to shut down the feeling? While there may be some eating habits that we can control, our biology determines much of our appetite, and there’s more and…

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Where body fat is carried can predict cancer risk

Scientists have found that carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer. It shows that adding about 11cm to the waistline increased the risk of obesity related cancers1 by 13 per cent. For bowel cancer, adding around 8 cm to the hips is linked to an increased risk of 15 per cent.2 Carrying excess body fat can change the levels of sex hormones, such as oestrogen and testosterone, can cause levels of insulin to rise, and lead to inflammation, all…

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Garcinia cambogia: Does it work?

The garcinia cambogia fruit has been a focus for many people looking for natural ways to lose weight. The small fruit, which resembles a cross between a pumpkin and a tomato, is native to India and Southeast Asia and is exported all over the world   What is garcinia cambogia? The garcinia cambogia fruit is native to India and Southeast Asia and is marketed as a natural weight loss food. Finding out what garcinia cambogia is and how it works can help people understand whether the weight loss claims are true and…

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Most of us know that physical activity is good for us. But a new study shows that a chronic lack of physical activity can drastically increase the chance of developing cancer in the bladder and kidneys, and it suggests that engaging in more physical activity may reduce this risk. [man lounging on sofa] New research suggests that chronic sedentarism can increase the risk of bladder and kidney cancer by over 70 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, every year, almost 57,000 adults have kidney and renal pelvis cancers in the United States. Additionally, almost 14,000 people per year die from these cancers. Bladder cancer is also widespread. According to the CDC, around 71,000 U.S. individuals developed bladder cancer in 2013, and almost 16,000 people died as a result. A team of researchers at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY, set out to examine the link between leading a sedentary lifestyle and the risk of developing kidney or bladder cancer. The findings were published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology. The researchers were led by Dr. Kirsten Moysich, distinguished professor of oncology in the Departments of Cancer Prevention and Control and Immunology at Roswell Park, and Rikki Cannioto, assistant professor of oncology also in the Department of Cancer Prevention and Control at Roswell Park. Drs. Moysich and Cannioto, along with their colleagues, analyzed 160 people with renal (kidney) cancer, 208 bladder cancer patients, and 766 healthy controls. Participants were asked to report on their levels of physical activity – namely, whether or not they took part in any regular or weekly recreational physical activity throughout the course of their lives. Those who said that they had never done so were classified as “physically inactive.” The researchers used unconditional multivariable logistic regression methods to calculate the odds of developing renal and bladder cancer. Inactivity increases kidney and bladder cancer risks by up to 77 percent Overall, the authors found “evidence of a positive association between renal and bladder cancer with lifetime recreational physical inactivity.” Specifically, they found that those who were physically inactive were 77 percent more likely to develop renal cancer and 73 percent more likely to develop cancer of the bladder. A similar risk was found among people with obesity and people with a normal body weight – that is, having a body mass index (BMI) of below 30. This suggests that leading a sedentary lifestyle is an independent factor that influences bladder and renal cancer risk independently of obesity. This study adds to previous data that have shown the same correlation. Former studies have also indicated a link between chronic physical inactivity and an increased risk of ovarian and cervical cancer. However, the authors concede that additional, larger-scale, prospective studies are needed to consolidate the findings. Dr. Moysich comments on the results and urges people to engage in a simple, moderate form of physical activity: “We hope that findings like ours will motivate inactive people to engage in some form of physical activity. You don’t have to run marathons to reduce your cancer risk, but you have to do something – even small adjustments like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking around the block a couple of times on your lunch hour, or parking the car far away from the store when you go to the supermarket.” Dr. Cannioto also weighs in on the results, saying that the “findings underscore how important it is to maintain a healthy lifestyle, including getting and staying active. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends 150 minutes each week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes each week of vigorous physical activity as a way to generate significant, lasting health benefits.” Learn how a type of bladder cancer bears molecular features of breast cancer.

Honey and sugar are two of the most commonly used sweeteners. Honey is often regarded as the more healthful option, but is this really the case? Both honey and sugar add sweetness to meals and snacks. However, they have different tastes, textures, and nutritional profiles. This article explores the benefits and disadvantages of both honey and sugar for health and diet. Similarities and differences Honey contains less fructose and glucose when compared to sugar, but contains more calories. Honey and sugar are both carbohydrates, consisting of the two types of sugar:…

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Low physical activity increases risk of bladder, kidney cancer

Most of us know that physical activity is good for us. But a new study shows that a chronic lack of physical activity can drastically increase the chance of developing cancer in the bladder and kidneys, and it suggests that engaging in more physical activity may reduce this risk. New research suggests that chronic sedentarism can increase the risk of bladder and kidney cancer by over 70 percent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, every year, almost 57,000 adults have kidney and renal pelvis cancers in the United States. Additionally,…

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